Development of two-stage multi-anvil apparatus for low-temperature measurements

  • K. Ishigaki ISSP, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Chiba 277-8581, Japan.
  • J. Gouchi ISSP, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Chiba 277-8581, Japan.
  • S. Nagasaki ISSP, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Chiba 277-8581, Japan.
  • J. G. Cheng IOP, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, People’s Republic of China.
  • Y. Uwatoko ISSP Univ. Tokyo
Keywords: High pressure, low temperature, multi anvil

Abstract

The two-stage 6-8 multi-anvil (MA8) apparatus is an important large-volume, high-pressure technique that has been widely used in the high pressure mineralogy and material synthesis, mainly at room temperature or above. Recently, we have successfully developed a two-stage MA8 apparatus for low-temperature physical property measurements. The first-stage anvils at top and bottom sides are fabricated as a single piece in order to reduce the total size of the cylindrical module, which is put in a top-loading high pressure cryostat and compressed by a 1000 ton hydraulic press. A castable, split octahedral gasket with integrated fin was specifically designed in order to introduce the electrical leads from the inside sample container filled with a liquid pressure transmitting medium. By using tungsten carbide (WC) second-stage cubes with a truncated edge length of 3 mm and an octahedral gasket with an edge length of 6 mm, we have successfully generated pressure over 20 GPa at room temperature. Since the high pressure limit can be pushed to nearly 100 GPa by using the sintered diamond second-stage cubes, our MA8 apparatus has a great potential to expand the current pressure capacity for precise low-temperature measurements with a large sample volume.

Edited by: A. Goñi, A. Cantarero, J. S. Reparaz

Published
2019-08-12
How to Cite
Ishigaki, K., Gouchi, J., Nagasaki, S., Cheng, J. G., & Uwatoko, Y. (2019). Development of two-stage multi-anvil apparatus for low-temperature measurements. Papers in Physics, 11, 110006. https://doi.org/10.4279/pip.110006
Section
Articles